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  #1  
Old 02-21-2016, 10:21 PM
sourdust sourdust is offline
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Default First impressions

Cross-post from Steam forums:

What’s great about Zombisite?
The same things that were great about Din’s Curse:
1) An awesome character design system, with unique and varied skills. I love both “min-maxing” the system to find ways of building characters that are really powerful in unique ways, as well as “random” hybrids that combine skill trees that don’t really fit together, and trying to make it work anyway.
2) A good loot and combat system, nice balance of risk and reward.
3) Funny and strange emergent phenomenon.
4) The great sense of tension in pacing, the need to press ahead hard, sometimes head back to town to deal with real emergencies, the occasional inability to get back to town easily, etc etc.

This is a great basis for a game. Now, that said, the system is starting to sink under the burden of design choices, interfaces and other aspects that were made 10 years ago. There is a need to rethink some of these elements, to interrogate rigorously whether they add anything to the player experience.

The following is the beginnings of a list of what I believe needs overhaul:

1) Inventory management. This was always a weakpoint in Din’s Curse. I often found myself spending almost as much time shuffling items around between my various bags and my stash, trying to free up a few spaces to make the next expedition possible, and trying to remember why I had kept various pieces of loot, as I did adventuring.

This was OK, barely, in a game where all I really had to worry about was my own stuff. But in Zombisite, I am meant to worry about kitting out a whole town with stuff – but I don’t have any more inventory slots to lug the loot around.

Good games recognise that forcing a player to choose between leaving loot on the ground, or going back to town to sell/store stuff, is not really an interesting choice. This is multiplied many times where a single player is expected to haul loot around for a whole town.

Here’s what the essence of inventory management in this game should be: (a) all stuff I walk over gets hoovered up and sent back to town. (b) I get first dibs. (c) Then the whole rest of the town gets to choose. (d) Everything that’s left gets melted down for spare parts or sold.

The only part of that system that requires any meaningful player choice is (b), where I get to look through the loot and decide what I want to keep in my personal inventory/stash. Everything else should literally occur with a single click. Not a click on each item, a single click.

2) Identifying items. Why oh why did the fantasy game genre ever think it was a good idea to force players to identify items? How does this add in any way to the game experience? In gameplay terms, all it does in this game is force you to either pay a bit of cash to ID an item, or undertake a repetitive and time-wasting exercise in clicking each item. What’s the point behind the mechanic? Is it to force the player to make a choice between giving up a bit of time and giving up a bit of gold? There are about a hundred more interesting ways of creating such a choice. Like make me dig a hole in the ground and fill it in, or pay some henchman to do it. That would be just as interesting and a whole lot more streamlined. Or more constructively, just have all items already identified, decrease the gold a bit, and offer quest for a bit more gold. Same result – the player has to make a choice between time and gold (ie, whether to do the quest or not) – but the player gets to focus on adventuring rather than clicking each item and waiting, over and over and over again.

3) Getting and finishing quests. I never understood why, in Din’s Curse, you had to “accept” a quest, as if there were any quests you didn’t want... and then return to town to “finish” the quest. And the limit of six active quests was really annoying, it got in the way (sometimes) of efficient adventuring. OK, every once in a great while there was a quest by some nefarious townsperson that you might not want to do, but this hardly seemed to justify a whole lot of pointless clicking.

It looks like Zombisite has streamlined things a bit, by allowing quests to be finished anywhere. A step in the right direction – but having done that, why require the player to pull up a window and click on “finish” to finish the quest at all? Why doesn’t it just “finish” as soon as the quest conditions have been fulfilled? There is never a case in which you would want to delay finishing.

Similarly, what good is it to have a list of quests that you have to “accept”? Why not just show you quests, and as you complete the actions, they automatically get completed and you get your reward? Indeed, many quests function in sort of this way – if you kill Grubnub the boss, you get to cash in the quest, even if you didn’t accept it. But other quests don’t function this way, so it all feels arbitrary.

Similarly, it’s not fun running around town checking to see if anybody has a quest to offer, other than the main quest board in town. Why not just have all quests that anybody in town wants done listed on the main quest board? Come to think of it, why have a physical quest board at all? What does it add to gameplay? Why not just allow the player to see available quests at anytime through the “Q” button?

4) Clan management/NPC management. I get the theory here, that having a dozen-odd characters running around the town, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, wants and fears, skills and inventory, should make for a rich and interesting experience of group management. The reality falls somewhat short... I just don’t find myself caring about any of them at all. At least in Din’s curse some of them played some essential function. Lose your merchants, and you might run out of potions or the ability to repair your stuff or a source of new gear. Lose your warmaster, and no new quests for a while. Etc. But in Zombisite, it looks like all the characters are disposable non-entities. I can finish a whole area all by myself, so what if my town gets torched? Everything I need is available through the unstaffed “crafting station”, the unstaffed “quest board” and if need be through the occasional wandering merchant or other clan's merchants.

None of the NPCs appear to have any special, indispensible function. And they aren’t part of the victory conditions for winning an area. And they don’t really help me accomplish my goals, they’re not really much good in a fight... so why care about them?

Ideally, I think you should want to recruit lots of lots of characters to your town, but not have to manage them all individually. Instead, there should be four specific roles that you can appoint NPCs to. Call them your deputies. Maybe one deputy is in charge of expeditions, one in charge of town defence, one in charge of happiness, and one in charge of the economy. Or whatever.

Make it so you care about those four. Everybody else is sorta generic, like now, you don’t have to care about them so much. But your four deputies, you really want to pay attention to. Cultivate their skills, make sure they have the right gear for their job, protect them etc. And give them real jobs to do – the “economy” guy might be the difference between a stream of gold coming in, and a stream of gold going out.

Finally, make these guys a bit more durable. I hate having to drop potions on NPCs in a constant stream during combat. Make it so I can give them a half-dozen potions, and they automatically take them when they need them!

5) Graphics. OK, graphics were never the game’s strong suit, and in Din’s Curse I got over it pretty quickly. The fluidity of the gameplay and the interesting nature of the game made it easy to overlook the jagged models and the physically painful colour combinations.

But I gotta say, what was OK five years ago is really dated now. And worse, I find the environmental graphics really get in the way of gameplay. The dungeons, as with Din’s Curse, are functional. But the outside environments are just a huge vomit-inspired mess, I often can’t tell what’s what. The florid vegetation is too over the top, scale it all back a bit. For a game where the outstanding modelling of every blade of grass is not the point, less is more. Get rid of 80% of the outdoor plants. Try and improve the polygon counts a bit...

6) The whole zombie apocalypse thing... it doesn’t feel like a zombie apocalypse. The whole zombie thing feels like a bit of window dressing on top of what is still basically Din’s Curse with other factions. The other factions is the big new thing, not the zombie infection thing. Part of this is perhaps related to point 4, about not really having to care about the townspeople. Or maybe I just haven’t played long enough and up to the higher levels. In a zombie apocalypse, I think regular zombie assaults on the town should be a feature, urgent calls for help from other factions, etc. A desperate shortage of gear. And so on.

7) Interface. We’re not in 2003, when everybody is playing on a desktop computer with a 2-button mouse. I play mostly on a MacBook Air. Trackpad, no 2-button system. Need to have keys be able to substitute for mouse clicks. And plenty of other interface improvements could be achieved.

Finally, keep up the great work! I played way more Din’s Curse than Diablo 3. These games are great, and I know as an indie developer your capacity to do all of the above may be limited.
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  #2  
Old 02-22-2016, 01:12 PM
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Crisses Crisses is offline
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Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
Not a click on each item, a single click.
I think the hoovering is quite unrealistic, although I understand the frustration. There's a psychological reason for the "gathering & dissemination of stuff" and perhaps it doesn't work for everyone. Different strokes.

If everything got hoovered, and I picked through and chose what I want, you still should be able to specifically dish out items to specific NPCs. Because you should put the happy or anti-insanity items on those who need them most, etc. The automatic system doesn't do that for you.

Managing your town is part of the game. I can understand wanting less item-management. Not sure it should go to a 1-click system, and "hoovering" is essentially like saying you have a teleport bag to your town chest that can fit full suits of armor through the opening -- but you're not allowed to hop in.

Quote:
2) Identifying items.
You can modify the game to have 0 identification time.

Quests:
Quote:
There is never a case in which you would want to delay finishing.
Item quests if your bag is full?

So let's say you automatically "accept" all quests? Does this go for only your own clan, or others' clans? How do you manage clan relations when automatically completing quests for Public Enemy #1 will tick off all your allies and cause them to go to war with you?

Quote:
Similarly, it’s not fun running around town checking to see if anybody has a quest to offer, other than the main quest board in town. Why not just have all quests that anybody in town wants done listed on the main quest board? Come to think of it, why have a physical quest board at all? What does it add to gameplay? Why not just allow the player to see available quests at anytime through the “Q” button?
I agree about the NPCs. It didn't add anything to the game taking the quests off the main town board.

As for the rest, I go to the relations screen and use my own clan to grab quests, especially while out of town... A click or two more, but it works.

The main problem is managing relations. Very important to only complete (as in cash in) the quests for other clans that you intend to.

Also, I like having a finite list of quests listed for the area I'm in. Sometimes the quest log is very long, and looking at a dozen at a time is more manageable. Much for the same reason that you don't want a To Do list that includes your entire life-long wishlist so it's pages long. You just end up feeling overwhelmed.

If it went to 1 long list, I'd like the ones for my current location to float to the top of the list. That would make it much easier.

I only accept the quests that must be accepted - the # monster quests, the find cave moth fossils etc. Unless I have to locate a villain/rescue on my map.

Quote:
Ideally, I think you should want to recruit lots of lots of characters to your town, but not have to manage them all individually. Instead, there should be four specific roles that you can appoint NPCs to. Call them your deputies. Maybe one deputy is in charge of expeditions, one in charge of town defence, one in charge of happiness, and one in charge of the economy. Or whatever.
Interesting. Food/economy (face it, I'm not sure why gold matters at all in this game -- it's the zombiepocalypse!). Housing/defense. Expeditions/quests. Personnel/Quality of Life.

I'd like to see cooks, bakers, brewers actively contribute to the clan somehow, rather than just "Start out with more food". I imagine these modify the starting food count when you go to a new area.

Quote:
But I gotta say, what was OK five years ago is really dated now. And worse, I find the environmental graphics really get in the way of gameplay. The dungeons, as with Din’s Curse, are functional. But the outside environments are just a huge vomit-inspired mess, I often can’t tell what’s what. The florid vegetation is too over the top, scale it all back a bit. For a game where the outstanding modelling of every blade of grass is not the point, less is more. Get rid of 80% of the outdoor plants. Try and improve the polygon counts a bit...
I don't mind the graphics at all, but I agree that gameplay is more important than complicated graphics. Certainly don't need so many plants outside. The caves have been giving people more trouble than the outdoors as far as slowdowns go. I turned off floor details to help with that.

Quote:
6) The whole zombie apocalypse thing... it doesn’t feel like a zombie apocalypse. The whole zombie thing feels like a bit of window dressing on top of what is still basically Din’s Curse with other factions. The other factions is the big new thing, not the zombie infection thing. Part of this is perhaps related to point 4, about not really having to care about the townspeople. Or maybe I just haven’t played long enough and up to the higher levels. In a zombie apocalypse, I think regular zombie assaults on the town should be a feature, urgent calls for help from other factions, etc. A desperate shortage of gear. And so on.
Pretty much agreed. I expected it to be more frightening. A tad more Horror. If you watch the intro screen, it's pretty much a bloodbath when the game starts (or when you activate creatures in an area), and no matter what kills creatures, they seem to come back as zombies. Even when they never got hurt by a zombie. It ends up being a mass of red dots that are all zombies, because they don't attack each other.

The zombie infection portion is OK. But it seems I can go back & forth to town without repercussions, or travel with NPCs without repercussions. I don't know whether it should be changed, it's just a matter of belting down potions until one works.

Right now it's zombiepocalypse with a huge slant in the favor of survival. So glad this isn't World War Z though. No one needs a sea of zombies flooding up over their walls.

Quote:
7) Interface. We’re not in 2003, when everybody is playing on a desktop computer with a 2-button mouse. I play mostly on a MacBook Air. Trackpad, no 2-button system. Need to have keys be able to substitute for mouse clicks. And plenty of other interface improvements could be achieved.
I want to be able to use the F-keys as well as number buttons for skills. It's possible to have a character with too many skills and not enough buttons. No need to go to my spell book to use a skill -- give me the F keys too.
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  #3  
Old 02-22-2016, 04:17 PM
Throwback Throwback is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post

The following is the beginnings of a list of what I believe needs overhaul:

1) Inventory management. This was always a weakpoint in Din’s Curse. I often found myself spending almost as much time shuffling items around between my various bags and my stash, trying to free up a few spaces to make the next expedition possible, and trying to remember why I had kept various pieces of loot, as I did adventuring.

This was OK, barely, in a game where all I really had to worry about was my own stuff. But in Zombisite, I am meant to worry about kitting out a whole town with stuff – but I don’t have any more inventory slots to lug the loot around.

Good games recognise that forcing a player to choose between leaving loot on the ground, or going back to town to sell/store stuff, is not really an interesting choice. This is multiplied many times where a single player is expected to haul loot around for a whole town.

Here’s what the essence of inventory management in this game should be: (a) all stuff I walk over gets hoovered up and sent back to town. (b) I get first dibs. (c) Then the whole rest of the town gets to choose. (d) Everything that’s left gets melted down for spare parts or sold.

The only part of that system that requires any meaningful player choice is (b), where I get to look through the loot and decide what I want to keep in my personal inventory/stash. Everything else should literally occur with a single click. Not a click on each item, a single click.
I've never had a problem myself. You pick up everything green, then when you get to town you go to the craft table. Mouse over each item and hit spacebar - if a clan member can use it, it will be automatically gifted to them. A single 'distribute items to clan' button would be a godsend though.

Inventory is basically functioning as a reason to head back to your town periodically, and I think it works fine. The starting levels can be a bit of a pain when you don't have any bags though.

Also you have two 'stashes'. Use them to set aside gear you may want to use later. The character stash is only for your current character, but the other one is a shared stash which any character can open, so if you find a nice item for a different class you can put it in there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
2) Identifying items. Why oh why did the fantasy game genre ever think it was a good idea to force players to identify items? How does this add in any way to the game experience? In gameplay terms, all it does in this game is force you to either pay a bit of cash to ID an item, or undertake a repetitive and time-wasting exercise in clicking each item. What’s the point behind the mechanic? Is it to force the player to make a choice between giving up a bit of time and giving up a bit of gold? There are about a hundred more interesting ways of creating such a choice. Like make me dig a hole in the ground and fill it in, or pay some henchman to do it. That would be just as interesting and a whole lot more streamlined. Or more constructively, just have all items already identified, decrease the gold a bit, and offer quest for a bit more gold. Same result – the player has to make a choice between time and gold (ie, whether to do the quest or not) – but the player gets to focus on adventuring rather than clicking each item and waiting, over and over and over again.
Go to your craft table; hit 'identify all'. Problem solved.

The identify ability is there so you can choose to check out something immediately when you find it, at the cost of time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
3) Getting and finishing quests. I never understood why, in Din’s Curse, you had to “accept” a quest, as if there were any quests you didn’t want... and then return to town to “finish” the quest. And the limit of six active quests was really annoying, it got in the way (sometimes) of efficient adventuring. OK, every once in a great while there was a quest by some nefarious townsperson that you might not want to do, but this hardly seemed to justify a whole lot of pointless clicking.

It looks like Zombisite has streamlined things a bit, by allowing quests to be finished anywhere. A step in the right direction – but having done that, why require the player to pull up a window and click on “finish” to finish the quest at all? Why doesn’t it just “finish” as soon as the quest conditions have been fulfilled? There is never a case in which you would want to delay finishing.

Similarly, what good is it to have a list of quests that you have to “accept”? Why not just show you quests, and as you complete the actions, they automatically get completed and you get your reward? Indeed, many quests function in sort of this way – if you kill Grubnub the boss, you get to cash in the quest, even if you didn’t accept it. But other quests don’t function this way, so it all feels arbitrary.

Similarly, it’s not fun running around town checking to see if anybody has a quest to offer, other than the main quest board in town. Why not just have all quests that anybody in town wants done listed on the main quest board? Come to think of it, why have a physical quest board at all? What does it add to gameplay? Why not just allow the player to see available quests at anytime through the “Q” button?
Firstly, the map screen shows any clan members with quests (they will have the question mark symbol on the map). No need to run around the town.

I really like clan members giving out quests - it makes me feel like my townspeople matter, which was missing from this beta for a while. I agree the UI regarding completed quests which need to be handed in in town could be slightly clarified, but I don't feel its a priority issue.

There are definitely quests you don't want to hand in immediately - for example if your allies are at war with a faction you have inadvertently completed a quest for.

There aren't many quests you need to accept (if any). I will accept quests from my clan members, and quests that I'd like to keep track of - that's all.

The quests system is pretty easy and intuitive, I have no problem with it - and I really like townsfolk offering quests which I have to return to them to complete.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
4) Clan management/NPC management. I get the theory here, that having a dozen-odd characters running around the town, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, wants and fears, skills and inventory, should make for a rich and interesting experience of group management. The reality falls somewhat short... I just don’t find myself caring about any of them at all. At least in Din’s curse some of them played some essential function. Lose your merchants, and you might run out of potions or the ability to repair your stuff or a source of new gear. Lose your warmaster, and no new quests for a while. Etc. But in Zombisite, it looks like all the characters are disposable non-entities. I can finish a whole area all by myself, so what if my town gets torched? Everything I need is available through the unstaffed “crafting station”, the unstaffed “quest board” and if need be through the occasional wandering merchant or other clan's merchants.

None of the NPCs appear to have any special, indispensible function. And they aren’t part of the victory conditions for winning an area. And they don’t really help me accomplish my goals, they’re not really much good in a fight... so why care about them?

Ideally, I think you should want to recruit lots of lots of characters to your town, but not have to manage them all individually. Instead, there should be four specific roles that you can appoint NPCs to. Call them your deputies. Maybe one deputy is in charge of expeditions, one in charge of town defence, one in charge of happiness, and one in charge of the economy. Or whatever.

Make it so you care about those four. Everybody else is sorta generic, like now, you don’t have to care about them so much. But your four deputies, you really want to pay attention to. Cultivate their skills, make sure they have the right gear for their job, protect them etc. And give them real jobs to do – the “economy” guy might be the difference between a stream of gold coming in, and a stream of gold going out.

Finally, make these guys a bit more durable. I hate having to drop potions on NPCs in a constant stream during combat. Make it so I can give them a half-dozen potions, and they automatically take them when they need them!
Creating weapons/armour/flasks, providing buffs (this is huge), doing good combat damage...are you still very low level? Once you have a couple of members with things you want (weapon/armour creation and reduced repair costs are common examples), then you need other NPCs to keep your food up, then you need other NPCs to keep their happiness up...

Raiding other clans at higher levels can be somewhat difficult without plenty of fighters, and this applies even more to defending your clan.

However, having said all of that...there's no requirement to use clan members, and I think there is actually a mode that doesn't allow you to have clan members, if that's your thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
5) Graphics. OK, graphics were never the game’s strong suit, and in Din’s Curse I got over it pretty quickly. The fluidity of the gameplay and the interesting nature of the game made it easy to overlook the jagged models and the physically painful colour combinations.

But I gotta say, what was OK five years ago is really dated now. And worse, I find the environmental graphics really get in the way of gameplay. The dungeons, as with Din’s Curse, are functional. But the outside environments are just a huge vomit-inspired mess, I often can’t tell what’s what. The florid vegetation is too over the top, scale it all back a bit. For a game where the outstanding modelling of every blade of grass is not the point, less is more. Get rid of 80% of the outdoor plants. Try and improve the polygon counts a bit...
I agree the outdoors can be a bit much - especially when I can't see acid underneath the grass layer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
6) The whole zombie apocalypse thing... it doesn’t feel like a zombie apocalypse. The whole zombie thing feels like a bit of window dressing on top of what is still basically Din’s Curse with other factions. The other factions is the big new thing, not the zombie infection thing. Part of this is perhaps related to point 4, about not really having to care about the townspeople. Or maybe I just haven’t played long enough and up to the higher levels. In a zombie apocalypse, I think regular zombie assaults on the town should be a feature, urgent calls for help from other factions, etc. A desperate shortage of gear. And so on.
I felt exactly the same when I first started playing. As you get higher you will notice zombie versions of everything are far, far more evil than their regular counterparts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sourdust View Post
7) Interface. We’re not in 2003, when everybody is playing on a desktop computer with a 2-button mouse. I play mostly on a MacBook Air. Trackpad, no 2-button system. Need to have keys be able to substitute for mouse clicks. And plenty of other interface improvements could be achieved.
Realistically, I don't think playing without a mouse is an important addition. It would be a lot of work for a small studio that is already undertaking a very ambitious project, to benefit a tiny number of players. You can buy a mouse very cheaply these days.

Last edited by Throwback : 02-22-2016 at 04:24 PM.
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  #4  
Old 02-22-2016, 06:58 PM
sourdust sourdust is offline
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Thanks folks for the thoughtful replies!

My point on identifying items is that the whole dynamic adds nothing to the game. Why have unidentified items? How does it make the game better? Is it just a tax on the player? If so, why not just reduce gold a bit and be done with it?

As with any good game, the focus should be on maximising time spent in the thick of the action and in making meaningful decisions. Clicking on items to ID them is neither. And inventory management and recycling is close to the same deal...

On quest management, I see the point that sometimes there are quests you don't want to complete... but I still think the whole system is in need of streamlining. Show all quests available, with a button to show only those in the current zone, and/or only those from certain factions. Always automatically finish your own faction's quests, and those of factions you are allied with. Only ask if you accidentally finish an enemy's quest.

And on interface - yes, sure I can buy a mouse, and of course I have one - but I can't use a mouse on the train, on an airplane, etc.
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:55 PM
Throwback Throwback is offline
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On item identifying - there is instant ID available at your base. The current system forces you back to your base, creating a sense of attachment and meaning to your base. It's where you upgrade your items too, so it become a place to heal and get stronger. It's about the mental effect. I don't personally want to *just* run and kill monsters, that would be insanely boring.

Same goes for quests from clan members.

Re the mouse, I was really saying 'what's the best use of a small company's time'. There are a thousand improvements they could make which are, imho, more important and affect more players than adding key support.
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Old 02-22-2016, 08:34 PM
sourdust sourdust is offline
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I'm all for fostering a sense of attachment to your base. But forcing a character back to do an uninteresting task is not the same as creating attachment and meaning. It's not creating a positive draw to the base, just a period of mandatory dull time where I have to journey back, click around on items for a bit, and then go do more interesting things.

Some actual meaningful things to do in town would be better. Like making decisions about the base's development. Build new buildings, give people orders, invest in some sort of base tech tree, etc. Make decisions that might have something to do with the supposed zombie apocalypse, like researching aspects of the epidemic or whatever.

There are games that do group management and base building really well. My base in Pillars of Eternity, now there's a base worth caring about! My crew in Rebuild 3, that's how group management should be. Quick and easy, give them a task to do, watch their happiness, give them one special item each (rather than having to track whether they're wearing cloth or leather shoes), help them through mini-plotlines that pop up now and again.

Those games don't have to "force" you to care about your base or your team by creating busywork or artificial constraints, you want to do it because its fun and essential to success.

Each system in the game should be like that - either it's action, or it's meaningful decision-making (not micromanagement). If it's not either of those, scrap it.
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Old 02-23-2016, 04:18 PM
Throwback Throwback is offline
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I haven't played Pillars, but I'll answer assuming it is similar in its operation to Divinity:Original Sin and Baldur's Gate.

Zombasite is an ARPG with more scope than any other ARPG I have ever seen. The focus is on building your character and his/her support (clan members). It may be possible to do the things you want, but you are asking for more scope in a game that already has a scope that is clearly stretching the limits of the dev team (and also is beyond the scope of any other comparable game that I know of).

As for identifying items, it's a design choice. It means you get stronger in chunks not always item by item. It means that when you are out in the world, you are killing things, not stopping every 30 seconds to check out your latest item. You don't like it and you don't have to - but that is what the design decision does.

Afaik you don't have to micromanage your crew's items. I don't and I haven't had any issues, though I am currently only level 23 so maybe that will change. I have attempted many characters though (100+ hours) so don't take that as me being fresh to the game.
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Old 02-23-2016, 08:55 PM
Mithur Mithur is offline
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Comparing the game to at least make up your mind that it was one genre,Pillars of Eternity( story driven rpg group adventure),Rebuilt 3(4x strategy),and Zombasite ARPG with procedurally generated dynamic world and quests.
If you don't want to bored with other npc people build the character with Loner trait.
Getting quests from clan members,perhaps even to think that they were more varied(maybe we could give them quests at a friend's body and grave of the beloved,or heirloom).Crafting quests dont even need to be taken,so you can finish them in any time.
Button sort the items in the bags would be useful,I admit.For storing items as in the previous games by Soldak,there are two chests.
Breking stuff into components and identification of things in the city, and give items to clan members don't give me much trouble.
Also you can set the modes for each members of the clan: Guard(outside city walls),Rest(to restore happiness and lower insanity),Often to make items,Normal mode.Send clan members to hunt/loot potions of health and mana/adventure without the player.

Last edited by Mithur : 02-24-2016 at 07:24 AM.
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